Social Impact of Google Glass

google glassSo I’ve been wearing my google glass around Microsoft’s main campus and throughout my life. Normally, people are interested and, if anything, come and want to check them out. However, I finally this past week experienced open discrimination or even a mild harassment of sorts.

Don’t get excited, it’s not like Microsoft is not doing the same sort of thing with their own version or other companies like Meta building glasses that are much more interesting then google glass. It’s just Glass was first to market in terms of social impact and visibility that the common person is aware of it. Continue reading

The Future of Mobility

meI’m going a presentation that is public at the Microsoft Commons in Redmond in the Capitol Hill Room on April 11th.  from Noon to 1.  Come join me while we go through some group therapy around emerging trends, the marketplace, mobility and how all that matters to the business world.  Oh and maybe some talk about LOB (Line of Business Applications).  On second thought, it will probably be boring stuff you won’t be interested in that could help business’s be more productive and understand the mobility space so you wouldn’t try to come and all.  Yes totally a bad idea.    but if you must RSVP to events@poshconsulting.net

Special Edition: What I Really Do for a Living (the developer side)

[wire] stone

the [wire] stone logo from the Seattle office

Ok so my job title is ‘Principal UX Architect’ for an interactive design and marketing digital agency.  Typically I have a hard time explaining what that is let alone what a UX Architect is.  Part of what I do is technical,  and that is doing programming or software engineering and the other part is artsy designee things.  Now granted a lot of my work is UX ‘Design’ so things like wireframing, persona and user story development, and traditional ui design kinds of things but I also get into helping with market strategy analysis and the like.  As a Microsoft MVP I get to drink a lot of their kool-aide and I was recently asked to be part of the keynote of a Microsoft internal conference and they did this video from the developer standpoint to play right before I walked on stage.  Here it is and hopefully it will help explain some of what I do.

related links: the [wire] stone home page

Episode 10: Emerging Experiences in Retail and Consumer Facing Environments

Emmy Award Site

for Emmy Awards, Entertainment Tonight and SL1 Launch Keynote

Another great episode of #TiredAllOver on Emerging Experiences in retail and how those will evolve over the next several years, how we build them, what it means and maybe a bit about why brick and mortar won’t die and more.  It’s a fun monologue on how technology affects retail and UX professionals now and in the future additionally about how those technologies work together and how they compare with other market trends.

Related links to some of what I talked about:

Planar: http://www.planar.com/

HP: http://shopping.hp.com/en_US/home-office/-/static/page-ts?jumpid=re_11260_redirect_Aug12_touch_hho_redirect_redirect

windows 8: http://www.microsoft.com/click/services/Redirect2.ashx?CR_CC=200134971

Adobe: http://helpx.adobe.com/learning.html

Microsoft retail store video… talking about the engineering of one of the emerging experiences I did at [wire] stone. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mvpawardprogram/archive/2011/01/04/achieving-digital-zen-in-retail.aspx

and another some what related video from MSDN Bytes where I was interviewed about win8 experience design: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/bytes.aspx

Episode 9: The Harbinger of Death for the PC, Google Assimilates Kurzweil and the Death of the Mouse

Kurzweil

Kurzweil

In this episode I talk about some of the current stuff going on in the industry specifically and what I think about it. For example, how some shining star(s) seems to be surprised that PC sales have continued to drop even though 60 million licenses for Windows 8 have sold.  Further we’ll touch on what it means that Kurzweil now works at Google and the new emerging home industrial revolution of DIY’ers and Why the Mouse will not be going any where anytime soon.

Here are a few related links:

http://www.zdnet.com/google-hires-kurzweil-a-look-at-the-returns-7000008844/

http://makezine.com/

http://blogs.windows.com/windows/b/bloggingwindows/archive/2013/01/08/windows-8-60-million-licenses-sold.aspx

Episode 8: Slates, Ubiquitous Computing, Personal Developement and Arduinos

arduino

arduino micro-controller

In this episode I talk with my friend from RnD at Intel Ricki Godfrey about slates and the death of the desktop and laptop PC in the traditional since and the power of slates in using Arduino’s (Linux based micro controllers normally sold individually and a popular hobby for programmers and people interested in robotics) and Windows 8 to automate personal medical needs with a custom diabetic dashboard system and maybe a little bit of how one RnD engineering is using his own collection of Big Data in the cloud on a tiny slate computer and integrating that with various medical systems that doctors also can use.  And of course we drill down a bit on what phone Ricki use’s as an Intel RnD guy and it turns out he has a bit more of a healthy relationship with the phone then most of us.

more about Arduinos: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arduino

more on Intel: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/homepage.html

more on Windows 8: http://www.microsoft.com/click/services/Redirect2.ashx?CR_CC=200134971

And the Cloud Matter’s Because?

WARNING: This article is talking specifically to Technology Professionals about other Technology Professionals and is making deep assumptions that the reader knows a lot about the ‘Cloud’ and the industry at large.

I was asked a question recently: “How the ‘Cloud’ impacts tech industry professionals and why this trend is important to them and how they can benefit” which is a complex question.  Let’s look at the first part of the question, “How the ‘Cloud’ impacts… …professional’s…” which I think can be broken out in two parts.  Certainly the ‘Cloud’ impacts them in the same way it does consumers; in scenarios like OneNote for example, where I do stuff and magically it is on all my devices using a ‘Cloud’ service like sky drive.  Industry professionals, however, understand and appreciate this and that gets to the other element of that first question. That the impact really has been to give developers a greater way of using the power of distributed systems (i.e. the ‘Cloud’) than ever before.

The second part of the first question, “…why this trend is important…” has a very long and complex answer.  Especially for someone like me, that tends to be a bit of a futurist.  The ‘Cloud’ trend is part of the larger trend towards technological ubiquity. Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Google and other firms have provided additional infrastructure to use the power of the ‘Cloud’; that has really been a big driving force behind adoption.  The desire to use the power of the ‘Cloud’, I would argue, has always been there. What has changed, or is changing, is the friction against using it. I no longer have to rebuild the universe to get the ‘‘Cloud’’ helping me to do x, y or z task.  Additionally, this also feeds into the trend around ubiquitous computing that has spawned the phrase: “There Is An App For That”.  That being the case, it is important to understand that this has caused the emergence of an additional developer demographic I call the ‘Mobile App Developer’. These developers build mobile apps for devices on their own or as their only job.  The reason I differentiate this from a corporate professional engineer or from a hobbyist is that their mentality is different, their approach is different and you can’t say they are hobbyists while some may be working full time doing this.

This new segment that has emerged is eager to use any of the tools that are provided but have a higher level of friction towards anything ‘Cloud’ that costs money.  Azure, for example, is prohibitively expensive for the average “app” developer; where as for the professional developer, it’s a god send because there isn’t all the jumping around to get stuff set up. From a business standpoint you can lower cost, time to deliver and time to market is cut down.  The apps developer segment has a rich set of free, community based tools. They use these resources and actively avoid using anything like Azure that costs more than free.

Lastly, the final element: ‘How they can benefit’…

Well, all the buzz is about hosting costs and synchronization between devices and the ‘Cloud’ and all that and, for the technology professional type, this is true. The problem I’m seeing now is that things like Azure put off the emerging apps developer unless they are really corporate developers and this will continue to slow adoption of the ‘‘Cloud’’ in the form of services like Azure for some time.  That being said this segment continues to implement ‘Cloud’ based features using non pay related technologies (i.e. “open source” ) and services, and will continue to do so increasingly, so as to be able to compete in the apps marketplace.

In summary let me bullet a few things out… How the ‘Cloud’ impacts technology professionals:

  • Of course consumer impact around their usage
  • Increased pressure for apps to use the ‘Cloud’ through their behavior
  • Provides infrastructure for a more connected experience
  • For Individual Developers Provides additional cost to building and supporting applications
  • For companies it lowers time to market, hosting and infrastructure costs
  • Improves ROI of ‘Cloud’ based systems vs. other systems previously used prior to the onset of wide spread ‘Cloud’ systems
  • Requiring more training to keep up with additional technologies

Why this trend is important:

  • Part of the larger trend towards ubiquitous computing technology
  • Improving customer experience or user experience
  • Affects technology professionals ability to get and maintain jobs and thus adds additional training that may cost money but also time

How they benefit:

  • Many apps developers only see the benefit if there is no cost… this is bad for companies like Microsoft.
  • Can provide a competitive edge
  • To companies it can provide hosting and infrastructure cost savings.
  • Improved time to market
  • Improved reliability

Lastly, if nothing else, it matters; so pay attention.

Some related links:

http://www.Azure.com/

http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/

http://www.dropbox.com/

http://www.skydrive.com/

Episode 4: Surface Final Judgment

And in the last days Surface Pro shall come out and we all shall rejoice as we blindly follow the light and light of the world coming from Redmond or maybe we are drinking too much kool-aide. Pass me another cup…

Check out this episode where futurist Ryan Lane and I try to have a fair discussion about Surface and what we think about its future place amount the pilferer of device out in the marketplace and we try to predict the future at least of personal computers over the next several years.

Noted futurist and designer Ryan Lane from [wire] stone http://www.RyanLane.com/

and if you are interesting in learning more about Surface check it out here: http://www.Surface.com/